Klamath Ranch

A Brief History of the Chiloquin Area

HOME

Recreation

Wetlands

The Arts

Community

History

Klamath Tribes

CKCCAT

C C I P

C V I P

C V A S

Businesses

LINKS

CALENDAR

C I T Y

LIBRARY

Many years before Chiloquin became a town, it was a campsite for a group of Klamath Indians. Before the Treaty of 1864, which officially named them the "Klamaths", people of the E' ukskni, Plaikni and Mo' dokni tribes referred to themselves as Maqlaqs. The name of the town came from an old war chief, Chief Chay-lo-quin, but became known as Chiloquin since some people found the original name difficult to pronounce.

Between Heavenly Twins
Mare & Colt Graze in Unison...
©2007 Ali Litts

When the railroad was built north from Klamath Falls to the terminal point in Kirk in 1910, Chiloquin was nothing more than a few shacks and tents scattered over a wide field at the confluence of the Sprague and Williamson Rivers. The Chiloquin Mercantile and the Chiloquin Warehouse were the pioneer businesses in the town. The first movies were shown in the warehouse, where the audience sat on bales of hay and the picture machine was powered by the automobile engine of the itinerant movie operator. The first post office was established in 1912 with Mary A. Whittemore as postmistress.

During the daily round trip of the train from Klamath to Kirk through Chiloquin, the engineer stopped the train along Klamath Lake to pick up fisherman. One day the train waited while a fisherman continued to net the last fish for his bag limit.

A one-room school took care of the educational needs of the Chiloquin youngsters until the school year of 1918- 1919, when two teachers were used, rather than one. In the 1920s, Chiloquin's elementary and high school districts were formed. In the mid 1920s, construction began on a brick and stucco structure, which was finished in 1926 and housed the elementary and high school students. The last two years of high school were offered locally for the first time!